Raleigh Tamland Two: Mid-Term- by Guitar Ted

The Tamland Two with the 32mm MSO tires and American Classic Hurricane wheels.

The Tamland Two with the 32mm MSO tires and American Classic Hurricane wheels.

The Tamland Two has been getting ridden and I have played with a few modifications to the stock set up. In this post I will update my First Impressions, (see that HERE), and I will cover my additions and subtractions to the bike.

Now let’s take a look at the Tamland and some of the things you could do with the bike based on its feature set. First up I tried mounting a rack to the Tamland’s rack mounting points. I used a typical aluminum rack you might find anywhere.

The Tamland Two is ready for an adventure with rack, panniers, and a Revelate Tangle Bag.

The Tamland Two is ready for an adventure with rack, panniers, and a Revelate Tangle Bag.

The pannier I mounted is a Jaand Mini-Mountain bag and as you can see, the clearance to the pedals would be excellent. In fact, there is a lot of room for my size 11.5 feet to spin around. The rack mounted cleanly, and with the disc caliper tucked neatly into the rear triangle, the rack clears everything with no issues. The frame was also fitted with my medium sized Revelate Tangle Bag and as shown, it fits perfectly with zero issues. The down tube routed cables made the installation of the bag a snap. This bike will haul a light touring load with no issues. Camping, long, self supported rides, or space for extra clothes for commuting should be well within this bike’s capabilities.

The original FSA Energy Bar was swapped out for a more comfortable and practical Salsa Cycles Cowbell.

The original FSA Energy Bar was swapped out for a more comfortable and practical Salsa Cycles Cowbell.

In terms of modifications I have used a few different non-stock components to test the versatility of the Tamland Two. I used a set of American Classic Hurricane wheels and skinnier Clement 32mm MSO tires on a metric century gravel ride. This combination livened up the acceleration and handling a tad. If the Tamland owner wanted to use this bike as a road bike for a benefit ride, or recreational road event, it would do a great job. Ride feel is a tad harsher with lower volume tires, but that’s to be expected.

A more permanent modification was made as I switched over to my personal favorite handle bar, the Salsa Cycles Cowbell. The wider width and better bend in the drops was welcomed. The stock FSA bars suffered from a bad reach to the levers in the drops, which I found to be unacceptable.

As I stated in the opening post on the Tamland, the bike has plenty of tire clearance for bigger, gravel oriented rubber. I stuffed in my pair of Bruce Gordon Rock & Road tires and there is definitely enough clearance for mud. The stock Weinman rims have a 20mm internal width, by the way, so the tires mounted to it get a nice spread.

While it exhibits excellent shifting manners, the crank set's 52T big ring seems a bit much.

While it exhibits excellent shifting manners, the crank set’s 52T big ring seems a bit much.

In terms of components the Tamland Two has been mostly very satisfactory. Other than the aforementioned FSA Energy handle bar, the bike has been solid and a great performer. I am not particularly fond of having such a big ring on the crank as the spec’ed 52T outer that came with the Ultegra 11 speed group. That may get replaced by the cyclo cross specific 46T outer that is also offered for the Ultegra 11 speed group.

 

The TRP Spyre brake caliper may  have a clearance issue with spokes on some wheels. (See arrow)

The TRP Spyre brake caliper may have a clearance issue with spokes on some wheels. (See arrow)

The TRP brakes have been revelatory in their quiet, powerful performance, however, an issue may arise with some aftermarket, or replacement disc wheels. I found that the American Classic Hurricane wheels actually had a tiny bit of spoke interference with the caliper. It really isn’t a problem with any wheels out there, (and the stock ones clear fine), but the TRP Spyre caliper is very wide and comes into close proximity of the “heads in” spokes on some wheel sets. If you get a Tamland and are going to swap out the wheels, be sure to check the fit before you take the plunge on a different wheel set.

I’ve had a bit more time on the Tamland in varying terrain, but I want to complete a few bigger rides and when I do, I will come back with a Final Review on this bike next. Stay tuned!

Note: Guitar Ted bought this bicycle and is not being paid nor bribed for this review by Raleigh, or any of the component manufacturers represented on the build. I will strive to give my honest thoughts and opinions throughout.